Nānākuli-Wai’anae Complex Area

Project HI Aware and School Climate Transformation


Now is the Time...

Children are the Priority, 

Change is the Reality, 

Collaboration is the Strategy

Promoting Mental Health...

Improving Academics! http://tinyurl.com/MHacademicsVideo                  

 <<<<<<<   Click Here for Twitter Pictures of Grant Activities

 

Recent Posts

Assembly of the Healthy Child: The Next Steps (All invested in pre-school)

In her talk "Assembly of the Healthy Child: The Next Steps,” educational psychologist Kathleen Gallagher discusses how investing in high quality early childhood programs, especially for children whose families live in poverty, can transform the wellbeing of entire communities. Dr. Gallagher designs and evaluates approaches that elevate the development and wellbeing of young children, families, and early childhood professionals – particularly in the contexts of poverty, adversity and disability. Dr. Gallagher’s research and applied work focuses on the design, implementation and evaluation of evidence-based approaches that support the learning and well-being of young children, families, and early childhood professionals in the contexts of poverty and disability. Her current projects include 1) an intervention to support toddlers with autism and their families, 2) evaluation of a project to enhance rural North Carolina’s communities’ early childhood systems, 3) development of a mindfulness-based program to enhance the health and well-being of early childhood professionals.

Bullying: It's Not OK (All) American Academy of Pediatrics

Bullying is when one child picks on another child again and again. Usually children who are being bullied are either weaker or smaller, are shy, and generally feel helpless.

 

Facts About Bullying 

  • Both girls and boys can be bullies.
  • Bullies target children who cry, get mad, or easily give in to them. 
  • There are 3 types of bullying.
    • Physical—hitting, kicking, pushing, choking, punching
    • Verbal—threatening, taunting, teasing, hate speech
    • Social—excluding victims from activities or starting rumors about them

Bullying Happens:

  • At school—in the halls, at lunch, or in the bathroom, when teachers are not there to see what is going on.
  • When adults are not watching—going to and from school, on the playground, or in the neighborhood.
  • Through e-mail or instant messaging—rumors are spread or nasty notes are sent. 

Bullying is Different from Fighting or Teasing:

  • A bully has power over another child. 
  • Bullies try to control other children by scaring them. 
  • Being picked on over and over can make your child a victim. 
  • Bullying usually happens when other children are watching.

Talk With Your Child About Bullying

Even if you don’t think your child is bullied, a bully, or a bystander, you will be helping to protect your child just by asking these questions:

  • “How are things going at school?” 
  • “What do you think of the other kids in your class?” 
  • “Does anyone get picked on or bullied?” 

When your child is bullied, talk with your child about how to stay safe. Bullies always pick on smaller or weaker children. If there is a fight, and the bully “wins,” this will only make matters worse for your child.

Help your child learn how to respond

Let’s talk about what you can do and say if this happens again.

Teach your child how to:

  • Look the bully in the eye.
  • Stand tall and stay calm in a difficult situation. 
  • Walk away.

Teach your child how to say in a firm voice: 

  • “I don’t like what you are doing.” 
  • “Please do NOT talk to me like that.” 
  •  “Why would you say that?”

Just telling your child to do and say these things is not enough. For many children, these skills do not come naturally. It is like learning a new language—lots of practice is needed. Practice so that, in the heat of the moment, these skills will come to your child naturally.

Teach your child when and how to ask for help. Your child should not be afraid to ask an adult for help when bullying happens. Since some children are embarrassed about being bullied, parents need to let their children know that being bullied is not their fault.

Encourage your child to make friends with other children. There are many adult-supervised groups, in and out of school, that your child can join. Invite your child’s friends over to your home. Children who are loners are more likely to get picked on.

Support activities that interest your child. By participating in activities such as team sports, music groups, or social clubs, your child will develop new abilities and social skills. When children feel good about how they relate to others, they are less likely to be picked on.

Alert school officials to the problems and work with them on solutions.

  • Since bullying often occurs outside the classroom, talk with the principal, guidance counselor, or playground monitors, as well as your child’s teachers. When school officials know about bullying, they can help stop it. 
  • Write down and report all bullying to your child’s school. By knowing when and where the bullying occurs, you and your child can better plan what to do if it happens again. 
  • Some children who are bullied will fear going to school, have difficulty paying attention at school, or develop symptoms like headaches or stomach pains.

When Your Child is the Bully

If you know that your child is bullying others, take it very seriously. Now is the time when you can change your child’s behavior.

In the long run, bullies continue to have problems. These problems often get worse. If the bullying behavior is allowed to continue, then when these children become adults, they are much less successful in their work and family lives and may even get in trouble with the law.

Set firm and consistent limits on your child’s aggressive behavior. Be sure your child knows that bullying is never OK.

Be a positive role model. Children need to develop new and constructive strategies for getting what they want.

Show children that they can get what they want without teasing, threatening, or hurting someone. All children can learn to treat others with respect.

Use effective, nonphysical discipline, such as loss of privileges. When your child needs discipline, explain why the behavior was wrong and how your child can change it.

Help your child understand how bullying hurts other children. Give real examples of the good and bad results of your child’s actions.

Develop practical solutions with others. Together with the school principal, teachers, counselors, and parents of the children your child has bullied, find positive ways to stop the bullying.      

Last Updated 11/21/2015 
Source:  Connected Kids: Safe, Strong, Secure (Copyright © 2006 American Academy of Pediatrics)

Two New Youth Mental Health First Aid Dates Added (18+ All Welcome)

The Nanakuli-Waianae Complex Area has initiated our monthly Youth Mental Health First Aid Training (YMHFA) Certification activities.

Our two new dates are March 1 or March 2, 2016.   Similar to ‘First Aid’ and CPR, "Youth Mental Health First Aid’ teaches caring adults how to help youth experiencing mental health challenges or crises. The Project HI AWARE grant will fund this event". 

The training is all day long, 8 hours, 7:45-4:30.  YMHFA Certification is only granted to those who attend to the end of the session. 

Please share with url with those you think might be good candidates for this training that helps our youth.  That might include school counselors, SSCs, teachers and resource teachers, school health aides, SBBH staff, administrators, classified staff, athletic coaches/athletic directors, state agency workers, faith based and community partners.  More information is available by clicking (or cutting and pasting) the link below.   Please call me or email me if you have further questions. 

Registration  can be found at Eventbrite

February 17 https://www.eventbrite.com/e/waianae-youth-mental-health-first-aid-8-hour-course-1-day-registration-20147580957

March 1 https://www.eventbrite.com/e/waianae-youth-mental-health-first-aid-8-hour-course-1-day-tickets-20264775489

March 2 https://www.eventbrite.com/e/waianae-youth-mental-health-first-aid-8-hour-course-1-day-tickets-20483078439

How to fix a broken school? Lead fearlessly, love hard (Principals)

On Linda Cliatt-Wayman’s first day as principal at a failing high school in North Philadelphia, she was determined to lay down the law. But she soon realized the job was more complex than she thought. With palpable passion, she shares the three principles that helped her turn around three schools labeled “low-performing and persistently dangerous.” Her fearless determination to lead — and to love the students, no matter what — is a model for leaders in all fields.

Youth Mental Health First Aid

The Nanakuli Waianae Complex Area has initiated our monthly Youth Mental Health First Aid Training (YMHFA) Certification activities. Our first two dates are January 6 and February 17.  March dates coming as well.  Similar to ‘First Aid’ and CPR, "Youth Mental Health First Aid’ teaches caring adults how to help youth experiencing mental health challenges or crises. The Project HI AWARE grant will fund this event". 

The training is all day long, 8 hours, 7:45-4:30.  YMHFA Certification is only granted to those who attend to the end of the session. 

Please share with url with those you think might be good candidates for this training that helps our youth.  That might include school counselors, SSCs, teachers and resource teachers, school health aides, SBBH staff, administrators, classified staff, athletic coaches/athletic directors, state agency workers, faith based and community partners.  More information is available by clicking (or cutting and pasting) the link below.   Please call me or email me if you have further questions. 

Registration for February 17 can be found at Eventbrite   https://www.eventbrite.com/e/waianae-youth-mental-health-first-aid-8-hour-course-1-day-registration-20147580957

DOE awarded $12.7 million to enhance safety, mental health initiatives

Staff from three complex areas will receive training and assistance in evidence-based mental health interventions, case management, data collection and analysis, anti-bullying initiatives, and strategies to engage families and augment community resources.
 

HONOLULU - More than 30,000 public school students on Oahu and the Big Island will be the initial beneficiaries of a total of $12.7 million in federal infrastructure grants recently awarded to the Hawaii State Department of Education to promote safety and address mental health issues of youth.

The DOE's annual $1.9 million Project AWARE (Advancing Wellness and Resilience in Education) and $608,901 School Climate Transformation grants will help increase awareness of mental health issues, enhance early intervention systems, and connect children and families with services.

The grants are part of the White House's "Now is the Time" initiative to keep schools safer and increase access to mental-health programs.

Funds will be spent over five years in the Nanakuli-Waianae (NW) and Leilehua-Mililani-Waialua (LMW) complex areas on Oahu, as well as in the Kau-Keaau-Pahoa (KKP) complex on the Big Island. All areas are considered high-needs, with NW and KKP serving large populations of native Hawaiians, Pacific islanders and disadvantage students, and LMW enrolling the greatest number of military-dependents in Hawaii.

Staff will receive training and assistance in evidence-based mental health interventions, case management, data collection and analysis, anti-bullying initiatives, and strategies to engage families and augment community resources.

The goal is to foster community partnerships and state interagency collaboration as a way to build capacity, integrate and expand improved services statewide across the education, mental health, juvenile justice and law enforcement sectors.

"The social, emotional and behavioral well-being of our students is crucial to ensure they come to school ready to learn and maximize their opportunities," said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. "We look forward to building on our systems of support, increasing family outreach and collaborating with partner agencies."

For more information about School Climate Transformation grants, visit http://www2.ed.gov/programs/schoolclimatelea/index.html. Details about the Project AWARE grants can be found at http://www.samhsa.gov/grants/grant-announcements/sm-14-019.